5 Questions to Ask Before Hiring Someone to Help With Your Marketing (and the answers you should get)

 
Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Teal and Peach Summer Instagram Story (2).png
 

It’s finally 2019, and we’ve seen SO MANY people say they want to really focus on their marketing strategy this year. We obviously love that as a resolution, and we want to make sure you get started right. If you’re looking to hire a marketing specialist or coach to help you on your way, you want to make sure you get the right person for the job. So we’ve put together 5 questions you should ask before hiring someone.

1. What is your experience?

Yes, everyone has to start somewhere, but you want to trust someone experienced with your marketing. Don’t worry too much about finding someone in your specific niche; most of it is transferable. If you’re a wedding vendor wanting to grow your business through your email list, it’s better to have someone who has experience in every part of your strategy than to have someone who has worked exclusively with wedding vendors but can’t do email.

BONUS TIP

Don’t get caught up in specific examples. Some people, like us, have NDAs with many clients that prohibit us from sharing details. But we can still walk you through the strategies we used and the results we saw so you can see how they would work for you.

2. How will you help me achieve my business goals?

If you’re looking for someone to schedule meaningless content and wish your followers a Happy Donut Day, then this doesn’t really matter. (Not that there’s any donut hate here, of course.) But if you’re looking for someone to actually increase enquiries or footfall or sales, then that’s not going to cut it. The right person will have a clear idea of how their efforts will fit into your greater business strategy and help you reach your goals.

3. What do you think I should be doing differently?

This could go to two extremes. Either the person flounders and doesn’t have any solid suggestions, or they’re quick to give you a laundry list of what you’re doing wrong. Neither of these are good responses. If they don’t have anything to say, they’re not prepared for the call, which is a red flag. If they have too much to say, that indicates that they are likely to bulldoze your brand in favour of growth hacks and their vision for your company. Instead, look for someone who recognises the good things you’re doing and has a few suggestions for guiding you in the right direction.

BONUS TIP

This question should probably be answered with another question, or at least acknowledge the need for further conversation. If they don’t ask you about your business goals or ideal customer, how can they recommend the right tactics?

4. How soon should I expect to see results?

Success doesn’t happen overnight. If someone tells you they can double your Instagram following in a month or get you three new clients right away from social media, they’re either using spammy methods or spinning you the tale you want to hear. Our contracts are three months long, and that’s because we’re not in the business of overnight miracles. We’re in the business of building sustainable brands and customer bases.

5. What plan do you recommend for me?

Talking brass tacks is an important part of any business conversation, but the trick here is to try to avoid sticker shock. An experienced, talented marketing professional is not going to run your entire marketing plan for $500 a month. You’ll be lucky to pay that per platform for a highly specialised person. But if you ask this question and they try to sell you on everything all at once, you’re talking to the wrong person. Instead, they should be able to tell you where to focus your budget in order to achieve those business goals, and preferably they would provide a couple different package options.

BONUS TIP

Someone who is confident in their skills and results will never cut their prices for you in order to make the deal. They may trim back their offerings in order to fit into your budget, but they won’t reduce their rates. Not only should you not try to haggle with them, but you should count it as a red flag if they come back with a lower price.


If you want to ask us these questions, we’d love to answer them! Get in touch to schedule a strategy call today.

Samantha Gale